Timing can be key when it comes to Planned Giving marketing.

This point was made a while back when I recommended outreach around some key life milestones such as weddings, anniversaries, and college graduations.

While those milestones are largely focused on late spring and early summer, there are other well-timed opportunities that you may want to consider throughout the rest of the year.

August: National Make a Will/Estate Planning Month: While I’m not the biggest fan of the countless fill-in-the-blank months, I think for at least this year, a well-timed outreach highlighting this makes sense. The pandemic prompted many people to update wills and estate plans. However, for those who have not yet taken action, noting that it’s Make a Will month and encouraging including Planned Giving in the process might move some to action.

The holiday season: This is “use-your-best-judgment” territory. Donors are sure to get swamped with fundraising campaign appeals around the holiday season and chances are pretty good that your nonprofit will step up its marketing efforts accordingly.

While you want to avoid mixed messaging, there may be an opportunity to tactfully weave a Planned Giving message into a fundraising outreach that is otherwise focused on generating immediate donations.

For some of your more dedicated donors, a well-crafted letter that highlights Planned Giving might resonate with those feeling particularly charitable and are also contemplating their legacy amid the family-focused holiday season.

Resolution time: January 1st offers a collective fresh start for pretty much everyone. People are making resolutions, setting goals, and committing to getting stuff done that has languished on their to-do list. Connecting with the New Year mindset can provide an opportunity to move donors who have been contemplating a planned gift to action.

Tax season: There’s typically not a direct connection between Planned Giving and filing your taxes. Yet, tax season is a time in which people evaluate their finances and likely focus more of their attention on financial planning. That might present an opportunity to reintroduce the idea of making a planned gift to your nonprofit.

Successful Planned Giving marketing is not a one-and-done strategy. It takes time to get your audience’s attention and build a meaningful relationship.

Taking some time now to figure out how you can make the most of these opportunities can lead to year-round Planned Giving success.

Sign up for this free Givebutter webinar next Wednesday at 2:00 pm. I’ll share how you can get started with Planned Giving fundraising, who your best prospects are and how to promote your Planned Giving program.